Friday, 29 August 2014 12:31

Ooltewah Seniors Stay Active On the Move

cxnRegency Senior Living offers Ooltewah seniors a variety of activities meant to enrich their lives. You’re likely to find residents relaxing while creating arts and crafts, playing games like Bingo or The Price is Right, enjoying a social gathering, or perhaps participating in a scavenger hunt.

There’s plenty of facility-based activities with opportunities to be social, but Regency Senior Living is located in Hamilton County, offering the warmth of small town living with easy access to all that nearby Chattanooga has to offer. Our residents have opportunities to participate in outings to movies, musicals or even a local sporting event.

Some great possible outings in Hamilton County include:

Point Park Battlefield: See the site of the Civil War’s “Battle Above the Clouds” and enjoy a spectacular view of Lookout Valley, Moccasin Bend and downtown Chattanooga.

Hunter Museum of Art: Built on a 90-foot limestone bluff overlooking the Tennessee River, the Hunter Museum of American Art showcases the region’s finest collection of American art, spanning hundreds of years and including different media such as painting, sculpture, glass, and crafts.

Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum: A choo-choo lover’s paradise, with restored vintage trains and trips running daily during the warmer months.

Trail-of-Tears/The Passage: This outdoor exhibit at Ross’s Landing in downtown Chattanooga tells the story of the displaced Cherokees.

Tennessee Aquarium: Chattanooga’s top attraction featuring a variety of animals in giant fish tanks and habitats, including sharks, giant catfish, trout, baby alligators, turtles, butterflies, jellyfish, penguins, and more!

IMAX 3D theatre: The super-theater is now showing 3D movies about the Galapagos Islands and the South Pacific. Add an IMAX film to your aquarium visit for only $6. Most films have run times of 45 minutes.

Ruby Falls: See the spectacular 145-foot high underground waterfall inside Lookout Mountain, along with cave formations like stalactites and stalagmites.

Incline railway: Travel a mile up the side of Lookout Mountain from the historic St. Elmo neighborhood to Point Park. Get ready for a steep ride on this beloved landmark.

Chattanooga Lookouts (an AA Southern League baseball team) games: The Lookouts play at AT&T Field, which seats 6,160 fans. They often have theme nights and play against regional teams like the Birmingham Barons, Huntsville Stars, Tennessee Smokies, Montgomery Biscuits, Jackson Generals, and Pensacola Blue Wahoos.

Bessie Smith Cultural Center: This facility, an African American Museum & Performance Hall, is named after the legendary performer and contains artistic exhibits, high quality musical events and performances, and historical educational and cultural programs.

These are just a few of the attractions that make Ooltewah a great place to live!

Published in Active Senior Living

cxnAbout 12% of Tennessee seniors suffer from Alzheimer's disease, which took 2,440 lives in the state in 2010. That represents the fifth highest Alzheimer's death rate in America and a 138% increase in Alzheimer's deaths since 2000.

Nationally, one in every 3 seniors who dies each year has Alzheimer's or another dementia, according to the Alzheimer's Association.

Coming to grips with an Alzheimer's diagnosis from a doctor can be pretty terrifying. Some may be in denial or fail to recognize the early stages of the disease. But the sooner reality is accepted, the sooner the senior can share his or her wishes for future decisions and put legal, financial and care plans in place while still able to participate in dialogue with loved ones.

At Regency Senior Living, we let families know they are not along in their struggle, offering memory care services. Our memory care residents enjoy all of the benefits of assisted living at Regency to receive help they need with daily activities, but the caregiver-to-resident ratio is greater to give the senior a more personalized level of care.

We form the care strategy after talking with the resident's family to learn what is important to them. We believe that guided independence helps a person in memory care treatment maintain their dignity. We focus on helping them retain their skills through personalized activities and respect their privacy.

Regency works hand-in-hand with the local Alzheimer's Association to assist in continued education of our staff, hosting support groups for our families, and educating people in the Chattanooga area.

The association is organizing the 2014 Walk to End Alzheimer's in Chattanooga on Sept. 20th at the Tennessee RiverPark. A walk event in Cleveland will be Sept. 27th at the Cleveland Greenway. The event raises money to help advance Alzheimer's support, care and research. To donate and/or participate, visit http://act.alz.org/site/TR/Walk2014/TN-MidSouth?fr_id=5421&pg=entry or volunteer with Cindy Lowery at (423) 265-3600.

To learn more about Memory Care at Regency Senior Living, visit http://regencyseniorliving.com/chattanooga-senior-living-options or call (615) 598-0245.

Further reading:

Alzheimer's Association: http://www.alz.org/

The Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center: http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers

Alzheimer's Reading Room: http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/

The New York Times "New Old Age" Blog: http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/

 

Photo Credit: Mr. Theklan via Compfight cc

Published in Memory Care

Scheduling a game night with friends or watching a funny movie may be just the prescription for Chattanooga Seniors.

That’s because scientists have shown that laughter has many positive impacts on the mind and the body beyond momentarily feeling good.

For example, watching a funny TV show or movie triggers the release of feel-good chemicals into the body that make us forget our aches and pains as muscles relax and stress hormones lower. Relieving tension in the muscles helps us sleep better, which is a powerful antidote to stress and pain in itself. One man with a painful spinal condition was able to sleep for hours after watching Marx Brothers films.

Sharing a good joke or funny story with friends builds our sense of connection to them, enhancing those relationships. Smiling and laughing naturally attracts others to us. Wouldn’t you rather spend time with someone who seems genuinely joyful than someone who is often anxious, angry or sad?

Laughter raises the number of infection-fighting antibodies and boosts our immune cells too. One study of people with diabetes found lower blood sugar levels after watch a comedy than sitting through a tedious lecture.

Humor also gets our blood flowing in the same way as a workout, so we actually can burn calories and improve blood flow enough to fight off cardiovascular problems.

With so many benefits, you might wonder how you can have a few laughs, especially if you are stressed out or simply not in the mood.

Some suggestions include goofing around with children, playing with a pet, reading the funny pages, going to a comedy club, or making time for fun activities like bowling or karaoke with friends.

Bring more humor into your life and enjoy the medicinal effects of a good laugh. 

 

Photo Credit: Kyrre Gjerstad via Compfight cc

Published in Active Senior Living

Doctor's appointments can be overwhelming at times. Time in the exam room seems to fly by at warp speed. Did you have time to tell your doctor in Ooltewah or Chattanooga about that funny symptom that has been on your mind? What was the dosage for the new medication again? It is imperative that you and your physician have open communication in order to assure that you get the best possible medical care.

A small amount of pre-appointment preparation will allow you to have a more relaxed and beneficial experience at your next doctor's visit.

CALL AHEAD!
When you call your doctor's office to set up your appointment, explain that you are a senior patient and request a bit of additional time be added to your exam time. This will give you a few additional minutes to discuss your issues with your doctor in an unhurried fashion. Typically you can give a list of your health issues to the nurse. They can pass them along to your physician.

BRING AN EXTRA SET OF EARS ALONG WITH YOU
A reliable third party can listen with you and help you be certain the details of your doctor's visit won't be forgotten.

MAKE A LIST
Write down any concerns that you have. A checklist will help you remember exactly what you want to discuss.

A HISTORY OF YOU
Bring along your complete medical history, a binder will help keep you organized. This is essential when visiting a new doctor. Key information includes current doctors' information, recent prescriptions, allergies, your insurance information, past and ongoing health concerns and treatments.
There are also some things you'll want to do during your appointment:

OPEN UP
Be prepared to discuss your symptoms. This will help your physician pinpoint the issues you are having.

SUMMARIZE
As your appointment is wrapping up, be sure to request that your doctor to review the important points made during your appointment. Feel free to go over anything that was discussed. This is the time to ask any lingering questions you may have.

LET'S BE CLEAR
Your doctor or nurse will be able to go over any written instructions with you at the conclusion of your visit. This review will allow you feel certain that you are clear regarding what the next steps are for your treatment.

Working together with your doctor is imperative in working toward your best health. A little preparation and active participation in your own health matters can help you and your doctor get the most out of your next doctor's appointment.

Photo Credit: heipei via Compfight cc

Published in Active Senior Living
Thursday, 11 April 2013 09:38

How To Improve Your Memory As You Age

blog9It’s never too late to improve your memory retention and keep your mind working like a well-oiled machine. Although many seniors are anxious about the possibility of memory loss, you don’t have to let this be part of your aging experience.

Even in the face of memory disorders and diseases, it’s possible to maintain your present memory function or slow the rate of memory loss with a few proactive steps.

  • Get moving! Many of us think of our bodies and minds as separate things, but physically they are connected. The health of one affects the health of the other. Keep your memory sharp by keeping your body strong. Exercise is possible for almost all level of physical fitness and health—what seems like little for one person may be a lot for another. Consult with a doctor, trainer, or physical therapist to develop an exercise regimen suitable for you. Exercise not only keeps your brain healthy, it can be a great way to socialize and experience new things, which are also excellent for your memory.
  • Get out! Speaking of socializing, it really is wonderful for memory care. Socializing stimulates many different parts of your brain, and encourages your brain to create new memories. It’s also fun and pleasurable, and the more pleasure chemicals in your brain, the healthier it will be. Isolation and depression have been linked in some studies to increased likelihood of memory disorders. If you live alone, consider a retirement community to give you more opportunities to interact and mingle.
  • Get into it! What interests you? Is it politics, literature, learning languages, shopping, art, music, games, entertaining, or something else? Spend time on whatever gets you the most excited. Lifelong learning is linked to strong memories. You’ve spent your whole life learning new things at school, work, in hobbies, and through relationships. Don’t stop now just because you’re retired! Take this time to try something new.
  • Get a bite to eat! Changing your diet can also have a big impact on your memory fitness. Fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein, and reducing your intake of sugars, carbs, sodium, and processed foods improve your overall health, and your mental health, too. Give your body the ingredients it needs to grow new brain tissue and reduce the stress weight-related diseases put on all your body’s systems.
  • Get lost! Well, not lost exactly, but it can be fun to break routines and try new things. Take a new route to your grand kids’ house, wander through a park you haven’t visited before, or try a different shopping center across town. The more opportunities you give your brain to think hard, remember new information, and get out of a rut, the more stimulated it will be, helping your memory.

Memory care is more than just preventive medicine—it can be a fun way to liven things up and get the most out of life. Trying new foods, new activities, and meeting new people aren’t just good for you, they’re also a great way to enjoy yourself to a whole new extent.

Published in Active Senior Living
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