Friday, 31 March 2017 17:03

Seniors and Spirituality

senior living bible studySeniors who focus on spiritual issues often:

  • Reflect deeper on signs and meanings through prayer
  • Come to rejoice death, not fear it
  • Seek solace in solitude and silence
  • Understand the value of community
  • Question beliefs for a better understanding

In a case study of seniors, it was reported that that: 

Sixty-five percent of adults 50 and over established that their religious beliefs are extremely important in daily life. This is likely a result of baby boomers being raised at a time when church was absolutely central to American life.

Sixty-seven percent of participants said that having a richly profound life immensely contributes to their daily life. It is not only vital to pay attention to physical wellbeing, but also how well it meets the social needs of the population.

The Pew Forum survey of religion finds that 74% of adults living in the Southern U.S. attend religious services at least one to two times every month, 41% weekly, and 71% of surveyors depicted themselves as "true believers" that God really exists.

While religion is simply a path to spirituality, this journey to spiritual freedom offers meaning and significance to one’s life. This is especially true while maturing into adulthood, and into the golden years of retirement.

Not only is religion beneficial to spiritual freedom, but it also offers physical, mental, and social wellness. As we age, it can become increasingly difficult to find the time to create meaningful social interactions with others. Despite the occasion, a number of our senior residents just enjoy the congregation.

As a role model Christian community, Regency Senior Living understands the need for individuals to exude their values and beliefs. Jeff Clay, Regency Senior Living's Vice President of Business Development says, “We do everything we can to provide them opportunities to worship and carry out their customs and practices.”

When reviewing our events calendar, you will promptly see that Regency regularly connects with nearby institutions of varying faiths to act as volunteers, and sometimes entertainment! This often includes ministry, worship, seminars, comedians, and other fun activities.

As a faith-based facility, we proudly welcome everyone, despite their cultural backgrounds or religious beliefs. We urge every person to feel open to communicating their own religious convictions. At Regency, we cherish our residents and provide them with a safe and secure home that they can feel comfortable in. We empower seniors and staff to pursue religion and spirituality for peace and prosperity.

In the event that you or a loved one are thinking about relocating into a senior living community, visit us today to get some information about our group, religious occasions, and spiritual standards. 

Written by: Katie Hanley

Published in Retirement Communities

regency senior christmasIt’s that time of year again – turkey, merriment, gifts, and a new year. In the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, it’s easy to feel down. If your adult children are grown and live far away or perhaps you recently lost a loved one or spouse, the holidays just aren’t the same. While it may seem impossible, there are a number of ways to add holiday cheer this Christmas, whether you’re living at home, in assisted living, or other retirement home. Here’s some, just to name a few: 

  • Visit with loved ones, if possible
  • Bake festive holiday cookies
  • Take them to see a performance of "The Nutcracker" 
  • Attend a candlelight service at church
  • Sing along to Christmas carols
  • Make a family photo album or scrapbook
  • For distant loved ones, call or FaceTime

With seasonal depression often follows senior isolation during the holidays, which is now at an all-time high and brings mental and physical health risks to seniors who feel cooped up. It is reported that seniors exemplifying behaviors of isolation have an increase in mortality rate and are typically linked to having higher blood pressure and long-term illnesses. To avoid this, it is important to find your holiday cheer and remain active, despite the cold or overcast weather. For our Regency residents, we encourage you to participate in both on and off campus events. These may include dinners with family, Christmas light sightseeing, and nativity scene viewing. 

If you’re feeling blue this Christmas, help spark your holiday joy by following these 3 tips for a more joyful Christmas this year for the entire family.

1. Involve them in your Christmas plans – Attending a candlelight service? Invite everyone to go with you. At Regency Senior Living, we encourage you to spend quality time with loved ones because nothing is better than the gift of family during the holiday season. 

2. Share your memories and make new ones – The holidays are a wonderful time to share some of your life stories to willing listeners. They will likely get a kick out of hearing your traditions when you were a kid. While sharing your old memories, make new ones. For example, make it an annual tradition of stringing popcorn on the Christmas tree with the family or host a lighting of the tree. This will give you something to look forward to in the holidays and years to come.

3. Stay occupied and positive - While stringing the popcorn is a rather tedious task, you might be able to find something else to help with this or other tasks, because it’s a great thing to feel needed. Perhaps you could be in charge of the annual lighting of the tree. If you are unable to contribute due to physical limitations, there’s something that you can do to contribute. If you feel down this Christmas because you believe that you have very little to offer your family, join in on planned activities and crafts, such as putting together a scrapbook, an ornament, or even record a family story.

In circumstances where getting together with family is not possible this holiday season, due to distance, health, or cost, you can still wish your friends and family a happy holiday using your tablet, phone, or computer. For those who aren’t able to be near family, remember you always have your Regency family.

Whatever your plans this Christmas, we wish you and all of your loved ones a very merry holiday season. Happy Holidays from the Regency Retirement Community!

Written by: Katie Hanley

Published in Retirement Communities

The need to scale back for most approaching seniors occurs when the children are fully grown-individuals and no longer living in the house. This frequently leaves empty nesters with the task of decluttering and downsizing into a littler space.

Specialists at Lifehack.org encourage when downsizing, beginning with a smaller, more manageable space to kick off the project. If not, starting out looking at everything in whole can without question become overwhelming. Scaling back is more effective when drawn-out all over weeks or months, not days. It is important to realize that it will require a great deal of time to sort through, since it has taken a great deal to accumulate. With every large project, don’t expect to have everything done in the first day. Simply remember no matter how small, progress is progress.

Decluttering Tips:

•      Be careful of saying, “I’ll do it later.” The uncertainty of an unexpected move to assisted living might come as a surprise, leaving no time to organize belongings.

•      Hold a yearly spring-cleaning to regularly tidy up, so the clutter can be controlled.

•      Plan everything out. Outline a week after week objective to keep on track.

Step 1senior moving day

Sort assets into three particular heaps that are either to be given, kept or disposed of. Steer clear from the indecisive, fourth "maybe" pile, as this prompts to uncertainty, instability, and a decrease in progress. Strategize based on priority to weed out items. Some of those things might be old clothing that no longer fits, dusty, disregarded books lying on the shelf, or multiples of the same item. Learn when to let go. Lifehack believes if it doesn’t "spark joy" let it go. If compelled to dispose of such things, remember that one man's junk could be another man's treasure.

Step 2

When cutting back, it's important to consider the restricted storage space in the new home. Most of the time, space is tight, particularly in assisted living communities. To help pare down, ask about the measurements of your new space, if not given already. This can be used as a physical guideline for the amount kept. For more troublesome decisions on letting go, use the yes-no strategy. To simplify, adapt to certain things that can be redesigned or reformatted into a smaller space. For instance, family photographs can be inserted into a scrapbook. This approach not only preserves the pictures, but also additionally takes less valuable square footage.

Also, if it hasn’t been used in over a year, it probably isn’t worth holding on to. Be cautious with the unnecessarily storing behaviors in seniors, as it may to result in a home that is unsafe or even unsanitary. This should be an obvious sign for more prominent health concerns. For example, bills left unpaid or recommended medications missed, these could all be cautioning indications of a more serious problem, like dementia or Alzheimer's. See a doctor if these issues continue or worsen.

Step 3

Discarded things should be donated, sold, or recycled. The neighborhood library or school may love those bins loaded with unused books. Or perhaps you could use some extra money. Selling items can give a new life to what was once old and unused. Lastly, if all else fails, always recycle when disposing to ensure the health of the environment.

For more tips, visit:http://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/15-9-5-senior-scaling back tips/

Is now your opportunity to spend your life free from added home expense and upkeep? Downsize into to a Regency Senior Retirement community today! Call us for more information at (423) 238-8087.

Written by: Katie Hanley

Published in Retirement Communities

Regency Senior LivingThe decision to move to Assisted Living can be a source of great conflict within families with aging loved ones no longer able to live alone. After getting settled in their new home, Regency residents often tell us, “I wish I had done this years ago”. But there was a time when they, too, were apprehensive about this life-changing situation and the implications on their independence.

Jeff Clay, Regency’s Vice President of Business Development, compared the process to the nervousness that a high school graduate feels going off to a college dorm -- except the “senior” is reversed with the child help the parent move to a new place. It’s not unusual for there to be initial feelings of homesickness and anxiety about making new friends in an unfamiliar place.

An aging parent may be adamant about not leaving a home where he or she has sentimental attachments, but grown children should encourage their senior parents to make such a movie before health worsens or there’s some sort of accident essentially forcing the decision. Actions taken during crisis situations may wreak chaos, especially if the parent is confused with the onset of dementia, so the process goes more smoothly with adequate contemplation and preparation.

“Seniors may have a preconceived notion that Assisted Living is going to be a cold, hospital-like setting, but when they visit, they quickly realize that living at Regency simply means having an apartment, except there’s help available to do things like housekeeping, laundry and remembering to take their medications. Residents are free to come and go, and they enjoy delicious meals in a social dining area, along with planned activities,” Clay said.

This is a contrast to nursing homes, which are primarily focused on providing skilled medical care. Regency offers an alternative that balances the senior’s desire to have social opportunities with the rest of the family’s need to have the peace-of-mind that help is never far away. If a resident with a closed door falls in their room, pull stations next to the bed and in the bathroom with adjustable length cords can summon help, in contrast to homes that typically lack such amenities.

Clay said when siblings are involved in the decision to move a parent, there may be disagreement on what to do. A local caregiver may have a different opinion than another child who lives far away and doesn’t see the parents as often. The remote family may not realize how frail a parent has become or the heavy toll circumstances can take on the primary caregiver who lives closer. In these instances, Clay encourages the children to weigh all their options and look at the situation objectively.

  • Some signs that it is time to consider a move to Assisted Living:
  • When cooking is too much trouble or housework is too difficult.
  • When a senior can’t remember when to take medicine.
  • When the only human interaction is a family member or an occasional visit from a church friend.
  • When a senior becomes afraid to be alone in the home.
  • When family members spend more time taking care of the housework, yard maintenance, repairs and caring for a senior than they do making great memories.
  • When the senior can no longer drive or has to depend on others to go shopping or to appointments.

As seniors age and mobility becomes an issue, their social circles begin to shrink. Much like the incoming college freshman who is anxious at first but eventually makes friends at a university, senior citizens can find that the future is their next, exciting chapter of life.

Although it can be a difficult conversation to have at family gatherings, “the talk” does not necessarily have to be negative if there’s honest communication. Experts recommend that grown children share their genuine concerns and listen to how the senior feels, presenting options to choose from rather than dictating to parents what is going to happen.

Take the time to shop around for the best community for the parent, factoring in location, services and activities offered, and how much the elderly parent likes a place. They may not like the prospect of moving out of their home, but they will almost certainly have a preference on where they’d rather be if it eventually happens. For many, they settle on Regency because of our “family” type atmosphere as much as the amenities.

A short-term stay, i.e., “trying it out”, might be in order since Regency’s apartments are available on a month-to-month basis. Someone can usually tell after a couple of weeks whether Assisted Living is for them. This is normal for someone recovering from a surgery who may need help for a short period with daily tasks, so it can apply to someone getting a feel for our place before deciding whether to sell their home.

When a new resident arrives at a Regency community, we conduct an activity survey and talk to the family so we can begin to get a sense of what the senior considers fun. New residents are paired with others who they may have something in common with. Coming together regularly for meals in a social dining area is a sure way to make friends fast. Regency staff may visit the room to encourage residents to participate in scheduled activities, but they also respect residents’ privacy.

These are just a few of the things to consider when thinking about moving an aging or disabled loved one to an Assisted Living Community.

For more information, visit http://regencyseniorliving.com/ To learn more about Regency Senior Living, call (615) 598-0245.

 

Written and Photographed by Steven Stiefel

Published in Retirement Communities
Wednesday, 30 March 2016 13:30

Spring a Great Time for Fun in the Sun

Tennessee Senior LivingAfter the long winter, it’s great to know that longer, warmer days are ahead. Active seniors welcome the opportunity to get outdoors.

Here are a few ideas for getting more enjoyment out of springtime:

  • Plant a Garden – Whether growing vegetables to eat or simply enjoying the scent of freshly cut flowers, this is THE best time of year for those who enjoy digging in the dirt and watching the beauty of nature at work. Will April showers bring May flowers?
  • Take a Picnic – With a little preparation, seniors can enjoy a picnic meal with family and friends, in the back yard or at a city park. Don’t forget the sandwiches and lemonade!
  • Visit a Farmer’s Market – This can be a great option for finding fresh veggies if tending to your own garden is too big of a project to take on by yourself. Many of the larger markets offer not only food items but arts and crafts and entertainment as well. Festivals are a big part of this time of year as well, many of them offering a showcase of all things Southern.
  • Take a Nature Walk – Many communities offer their citizens access to a walking park or botanical center where they can exercise at a leisurely pace. For those who are more active, hiking trails can lead to unexpected delights. Walking increases muscle strength, controls blood pressure and blood sugar and offers socialization experiences.
  • Bird Watch – It’s fun to listen to the birds chirping and try to identify what kind they are.
  • Spring Clean – Now is a great time to clear out some of the clutter lying around. While this might be more of an errand than a fun activity people look forward to, it can be entertaining going through keepsakes and recalling old memories. Plus, you’ll feel a sense of accomplishment while enjoying the fresh air. Senior caregivers should use this time to make sure air conditioning is working properly before the summer heat arrives in full force. Spring cleaning may include cleaning outdoor furniture and pulling weeds.
  • Spend Time with Family – With kids out of school for the summer break ahead, now is a great time to plan activities with grandchildren or day trips to go shopping in nearby cities.
  • Fly a Kite – Combine walking with the exhilaration of guiding a soaring kite.
  • Learn Something New – More daylight hours means more opportunities to participate in things going on in the community. This may be attending events at a church or community center or taking a class to learn something like ballroom dancing, yoga, painting, etc.

Seniors and caregivers should check with their doctor before participating in any strenuous activity. Not only is getting outdoors good for Vitamin D production, but the fresh air can actually boost happiness, which is important considering the rise of feelings of depression during the colder months.

Say goodbye to winter and hello to springtime. To learn more about Regency Senior Living, call (615) 598-0245.

Written by Steven Stiefel

Copyright: tunedin123 / 123RF Stock Photo

Published in Active Senior Living

It’s never too early to plan holiday celebrations that take the needs of your senior loved ones into consideration. The holidays can be a tough time for many seniors as they may feel lonely, isolated, or extra aware of health issues that they didn’t have in years past. With a little preparedness, you can help them beat the winter blues and create a wonderful holiday season.

Make sure that you senior loved one has plenty to look forward to, even when you’re busy handling other aspects of holiday planning. Perhaps they can be in charge of special outings or activities with the grandkids, or can handle some meal prep or shopping. Elderly people, especially those with memory care issues, need to have plenty to anticipate and focus on. You may not be able to share quality time constantly during the hectic holidays, by try to schedule a little something as often as possible. One on one conversation might be less stressful, and there’s no better gift than your undivided attention.

You can also use this time together to ensure your loved one is doing well and that his or her needs are being met. Just as the comparing this holiday to previous years’ might be a point of sadness for seniors, it can also be a point of comparison for you to see how their health and mental wellness really are. If you see your loved one struggling with mobility or find you are having to make adjustments for him or her so they can get around, manage basic tasks, or remember things, you might want to consider a retirement community.

Senior housing and assisted living are great options for seniors who need a little extra help but don’t want to lose their independence. They can also help seniors avoid stress and depression by providing plenty to see, do and look forward to and plenty of social interaction. Retirement facilities also help residents stay healthy by providing well prepared, nutritious meals, exercise classes, and opportunities to garden, walk, and more.

This holiday season, celebrate the seniors in your life, and check in to ensure their quality of life is the best it can be as we say farewell to 2013 and begin a new year. By planning ahead for the holidays, you’ll better be able to anticipate your loved one’s needs both at family celebrations and in the months to come.

Written by Meghan O'Dea

Published in Active Senior Living

blog1You might have, like many people, started planning for retirement a long time before you actually got to the finish line. There were accounts to open, financial planners to chat with, paperwork to navigate, and dreams to dream about hitting the golf course, traveling, and spoiling the grand kids. Just as you began planning retirement well in advance, you should also get a head start on the conversation with both yourself and loved ones about when you will be ready for a retirement community.

Many hear the words “retirement community” and assume they might be like the nursing homes from decades ago. It’s important, first, to recognize that retirement communities today are for all ages of retirees and many offer different levels of care tailored to your needs. Planning for when you might want to join a senior home isn’t a depressing bet on when you will fall ill or become frail, but instead a proactive process to decide when you will be ready to join a caring community of new friends, more opportunities to explore and enjoy yourself, and receive a little extra assistance as needed.

Just as you planned the first phase of your retirement and when you could stop working, go ahead and consider when in the future you might be ready for the retirement community phase. If you are already asking yourself if you’re ready for senior housing, that could be a sign you’re almost ready. Perhaps you’ve realized a big house is harder to maintain as an empty nest, and that you don’t need all the extra bedrooms. Perhaps you are wondering if you’d prefer to live in another city not that you aren’t tied there by your career. Perhaps you simply like the idea of being surrounded by peers who are in a similar place and enjoy similar pastimes, much as you might have in college.

Starting the conversation now can also make the emotional side of this decision easier. Both you and your friends and family might have feelings to take into account and navigate. It will be easier to do this slowly over time when everyone can be more objective and logical than in the emotionally heightened rush after a crisis like hospitalization. Especially if you are currently living with family, the emotions surrounding caretaking can be complicated for everyone involved. Time and open dialogue can make the transition easier.

Even if you don’t intend to move into a retirement community for some time, go ahead and talk to your family, loved ones, doctor, and financial planners now so you can strategize the best possible way to make your move when you are ready. Just as you learned with the first phase of retirement, it’s always best to plan ahead!

Written by Meghan O'Dea

Published in Active Senior Living
Friday, 29 August 2014 12:31

Ooltewah Seniors Stay Active On the Move

cxnRegency Senior Living offers Ooltewah seniors a variety of activities meant to enrich their lives. You’re likely to find residents relaxing while creating arts and crafts, playing games like Bingo or The Price is Right, enjoying a social gathering, or perhaps participating in a scavenger hunt.

There’s plenty of facility-based activities with opportunities to be social, but Regency Senior Living is located in Hamilton County, offering the warmth of small town living with easy access to all that nearby Chattanooga has to offer. Our residents have opportunities to participate in outings to movies, musicals or even a local sporting event.

Some great possible outings in Hamilton County include:

Point Park Battlefield: See the site of the Civil War’s “Battle Above the Clouds” and enjoy a spectacular view of Lookout Valley, Moccasin Bend and downtown Chattanooga.

Hunter Museum of Art: Built on a 90-foot limestone bluff overlooking the Tennessee River, the Hunter Museum of American Art showcases the region’s finest collection of American art, spanning hundreds of years and including different media such as painting, sculpture, glass, and crafts.

Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum: A choo-choo lover’s paradise, with restored vintage trains and trips running daily during the warmer months.

Trail-of-Tears/The Passage: This outdoor exhibit at Ross’s Landing in downtown Chattanooga tells the story of the displaced Cherokees.

Tennessee Aquarium: Chattanooga’s top attraction featuring a variety of animals in giant fish tanks and habitats, including sharks, giant catfish, trout, baby alligators, turtles, butterflies, jellyfish, penguins, and more!

IMAX 3D theatre: The super-theater is now showing 3D movies about the Galapagos Islands and the South Pacific. Add an IMAX film to your aquarium visit for only $6. Most films have run times of 45 minutes.

Ruby Falls: See the spectacular 145-foot high underground waterfall inside Lookout Mountain, along with cave formations like stalactites and stalagmites.

Incline railway: Travel a mile up the side of Lookout Mountain from the historic St. Elmo neighborhood to Point Park. Get ready for a steep ride on this beloved landmark.

Chattanooga Lookouts (an AA Southern League baseball team) games: The Lookouts play at AT&T Field, which seats 6,160 fans. They often have theme nights and play against regional teams like the Birmingham Barons, Huntsville Stars, Tennessee Smokies, Montgomery Biscuits, Jackson Generals, and Pensacola Blue Wahoos.

Bessie Smith Cultural Center: This facility, an African American Museum & Performance Hall, is named after the legendary performer and contains artistic exhibits, high quality musical events and performances, and historical educational and cultural programs.

These are just a few of the attractions that make Ooltewah a great place to live!

Published in Active Senior Living

cxnAbout 12% of Tennessee seniors suffer from Alzheimer's disease, which took 2,440 lives in the state in 2010. That represents the fifth highest Alzheimer's death rate in America and a 138% increase in Alzheimer's deaths since 2000.

Nationally, one in every 3 seniors who dies each year has Alzheimer's or another dementia, according to the Alzheimer's Association.

Coming to grips with an Alzheimer's diagnosis from a doctor can be pretty terrifying. Some may be in denial or fail to recognize the early stages of the disease. But the sooner reality is accepted, the sooner the senior can share his or her wishes for future decisions and put legal, financial and care plans in place while still able to participate in dialogue with loved ones.

At Regency Senior Living, we let families know they are not along in their struggle, offering memory care services. Our memory care residents enjoy all of the benefits of assisted living at Regency to receive help they need with daily activities, but the caregiver-to-resident ratio is greater to give the senior a more personalized level of care.

We form the care strategy after talking with the resident's family to learn what is important to them. We believe that guided independence helps a person in memory care treatment maintain their dignity. We focus on helping them retain their skills through personalized activities and respect their privacy.

Regency works hand-in-hand with the local Alzheimer's Association to assist in continued education of our staff, hosting support groups for our families, and educating people in the Chattanooga area.

The association is organizing the 2014 Walk to End Alzheimer's in Chattanooga on Sept. 20th at the Tennessee RiverPark. A walk event in Cleveland will be Sept. 27th at the Cleveland Greenway. The event raises money to help advance Alzheimer's support, care and research. To donate and/or participate, visit http://act.alz.org/site/TR/Walk2014/TN-MidSouth?fr_id=5421&pg=entry or volunteer with Cindy Lowery at (423) 265-3600.

To learn more about Memory Care at Regency Senior Living, visit http://regencyseniorliving.com/chattanooga-senior-living-options or call (615) 598-0245.

Further reading:

Alzheimer's Association: http://www.alz.org/

The Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center: http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers

Alzheimer's Reading Room: http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/

The New York Times "New Old Age" Blog: http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/

 

Photo Credit: Mr. Theklan via Compfight cc

Published in Memory Care

Scheduling a game night with friends or watching a funny movie may be just the prescription for Chattanooga Seniors.

That’s because scientists have shown that laughter has many positive impacts on the mind and the body beyond momentarily feeling good.

For example, watching a funny TV show or movie triggers the release of feel-good chemicals into the body that make us forget our aches and pains as muscles relax and stress hormones lower. Relieving tension in the muscles helps us sleep better, which is a powerful antidote to stress and pain in itself. One man with a painful spinal condition was able to sleep for hours after watching Marx Brothers films.

Sharing a good joke or funny story with friends builds our sense of connection to them, enhancing those relationships. Smiling and laughing naturally attracts others to us. Wouldn’t you rather spend time with someone who seems genuinely joyful than someone who is often anxious, angry or sad?

Laughter raises the number of infection-fighting antibodies and boosts our immune cells too. One study of people with diabetes found lower blood sugar levels after watch a comedy than sitting through a tedious lecture.

Humor also gets our blood flowing in the same way as a workout, so we actually can burn calories and improve blood flow enough to fight off cardiovascular problems.

With so many benefits, you might wonder how you can have a few laughs, especially if you are stressed out or simply not in the mood.

Some suggestions include goofing around with children, playing with a pet, reading the funny pages, going to a comedy club, or making time for fun activities like bowling or karaoke with friends.

Bring more humor into your life and enjoy the medicinal effects of a good laugh. 

 

Photo Credit: Kyrre Gjerstad via Compfight cc

Published in Active Senior Living
Page 1 of 2

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226

Warning: mysqli::stat(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 219

Warning: mysqli_close(): Couldn't fetch mysqli in /home/regencyseniorliv/public_html/libraries/joomla/database/driver/mysqli.php on line 226