Memory Care

Memory Care (5)

Regency Senior Living seniors and musicJune is National Effective Communications Month. Being able to express oneself in a clear and understandable manner helps decrease misinterpretation, confusion and conflict. But what are we to do when a disease of the brain causes a family member to experience more and more difficulty expressing thoughts and emotions? That’s exactly the challenge faced by families who have a loved one battling Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia.

A Memory Care neighborhood like the one at a Regency Senior Living community provides the attention and compassion that seniors and their families need in such a situation. Our caregivers work with the Alzheimer’s Association to deliver strategies of treatment that allow our residents to retain their dignity and remain connected to their pasts through a variety of activities. 

Day-to-day communication can be extremely frustrating for a family member attempting to serve the role of caregiver to someone impacted by dementia. It is heartbreaking to see the progression of the disease, as the senior struggles to find the right words, becomes repetitive, loses his or her train of thought, and relies on gestures more than speaking. 

Once Alzheimer’s reaches the late stage, around-the-clock care is usually needed. 

In Regency’s Memory Care neighborhood, residents are surrounded with the familiar. A jukebox might be playing songs that the senior knew as a teenager. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, music may help them to function at a higher cognitive level. Tunes can engage them in singing, rhythm playing, dancing, physical exercise, and other structured activities. Ballads and lullabies have been shown to calm someone during moments of agitation or when preparing for bed. Soothing sounds can provide a sense of comfort. 

Regency  regularly welcomes musical entertainers who may perform for Memory Care residents, often evoking a response of familiarity because our shared cultural connection to music invites an emotional reaction. Like anyone listening to a song to fit a given mood, the residents enjoy reconnecting with songs from their generation. The sounds of Elvis and Sinatra are quite familiar to those of us who live and work in our halls. 

Our community has recently become certified for a pilot program called Music and Memory. There have been instances where seniors with dementia have been unresponsive until headphones are placed on their ears and familiar tunes from their youth are played on an iPod. Even after the headphones are removed, the power of music moves  seniors to reacquire their cognitive faculties for a time. It reawakens feelings they haven’t felt in years. 

Appealing to the visual senses as well, the furniture and decorations in a typical Memory Care neighborhood use cheerful colors and may even resemble a corner drug store with a soda fountain or jukebox, just like the ones residents likely visited as children. Such an environment can prove helpful in breaking through the fog of confusion. Baby dolls can also offer comfort to some Memory Care residents. 

Another way to effectively communicate with a person dealing with Alzheimer’s is to minimize distractions, going to a quiet place and limiting conversations to one-on-one interactions. The Alzheimer’s Association recommends speaking clearly and slowly, avoiding lengthy requests. Maintaining eye contact and speaking slowly may also help. 

“Sometimes the emotions being expressed are more important than what is being said. Look for the feelings behind words or sounds,” the Alzheimer’s Association states on its website. “Treat the person with dignity and respect. Avoid talking down to the person or as if he or she isn’t there. It’s OK if you don’t know what to do or say; your presence and friendship are most important to the person.”

Maintaining a connection with their past and with their relationships is key to Regency’s Memory Care activities. Photos of loved ones and objects of personal significance may be displayed prominently inside a resident’s apartment. It is important for residents to feel at home and for their families to possess the peace of mind that they are safe while enjoying stimulating activities for a higher quality of life.

One resource that may interest families is The Alzheimer’s Caregiver Buddy, which teaches how to deal with wandering, bathing, and meals. It also provides live help 24 hours a day by clicking and calling the Alzheimer's Association toll-free 24-hour helpline at 1-800-272-3900.

Until science provides us with the key to preventing dementia cases in future generations, Memory Care offers a valuable resource for families struggling to effectively communicate with an elder affected by Alzheimer’s. 

For more tips on communicating with persons suffering from Alzheimer’s or another dementia, visit alz.org/commtips. For more information about the Music & Memory program, visit https://musicandmemory.org/.

Written by: Steven Stiefel 

memory care from Regency Senior LivingChange is an inevitable part of aging as time makes our bodies and brains slow down. Memory loss is a normal part of the process, but how do we know whether forgetfulness is the result of mild cognitive impairment or a more serious brain disorder?

With Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, the mental decline is severe enough to disrupt daily life by affecting core brain functions that control our ability to learn and recall information, as well as focus on tasks and solve problems.

Because Alzheimer’s is most prevalent in people over age 65, it can be difficult to tell whether the symptoms are normal or something more serious. Alzheimer’s is a slow, progressive illness that damages nerve cells in the brain.
What’s the distinction between a typical “senior moment” and a sign of Alzheimer’s?

  • It is the difference between a bad decision made once in a while and more frequent cases of showing poor judgment and decision making.
  • It is a senior missing a monthly bill payment as opposed to lacking the ability to manage a budget at all.
  • It is forgetting or mistaking which day of the week it is, in contrast to losing track of what season it is.
  • A senior might momentarily forget what something is called, but someone suffering from dementia will struggle just to have a conversation and fail to recall familiar people.
  • Finally, anyone can lose track of where we’ve left something, but the person with Alzheimer’s is utterly incapable of retracing their steps to find something they have left in a place that defies logic, e.g. the keys left in the freezer.

It’s important to base future decisions on the outcome of a diagnosis from a qualified medical professional rather than acting harshly based on assumptions and fears. A checkout may point to other, treatable causes that can be mistaken for Alzheimer’s, including depression or drug interactions.

The Alzheimer’s Association has a lot of helpful information on its website that can help families recognize the warning signs and symptoms, as well as research possible treatments and find support. Visit http://www.alz.org/ for more.

Regency retirement communities work hand-in-hand with their local Alzheimer’s Association chapters to assist in continued education, host support groups for our families, and educate the markets we serve. Importance is placed on residents retaining their dignity and privacy as we provide personalized care and activities.

To learn more about Regency Senior Living, call (615) 598-0245.

Written by Steven Stiefel

Copyright: voronin76 / 123RF Stock Photo

Approaching Alzheimer’s with a Plan

Sunday, 29 November 2015 23:05

dementiaWhen mild forgetfulness turns into serious memory problems, seniors and their families have to accept the difficult new reality that Alzheimer’s disease may be forever changing their lives. Recognizing dementia early on is key to ensuring that a loved one receives the highest quality of care and can adequately express his or her wishes for the future.

A medical exam is the first step in getting answers. A doctor can run tests to rule out other causes for symptoms such as forgetting the names of family members or important dates. Someone with Alzheimer’s may withdraw from social activities, display rapid mood swings for no discernable reason, display poor judgment, misplace things, and generally become easily confused.

Seniors may feel a range of emotions upon receiving confirmation, from a sense of relief to know what’s wrong to anger that life is taking a different course then the one they had planned. Knowing that they are not alone in confronting the disease provides relief from some of the stress.

The Alzheimer’s Association recommends that families do not put off difficult conversations about preparing for the future. Eventually, Alzheimer’s progresses to the point of affecting everyday life and incapacitating the ability to make decisions about treatment, management of assets and legal arrangements. Someone with the disease may live for many years after receiving the initial diagnosis – the quality of their life depends greatly on the choices made in the early stages when they make their wishes known and get their affairs in order.

“As the disease progresses, you will need the support of those who know and understand you. Concealing or denying your diagnosis will limit your ability to cope with the challenges ahead,” the Alzheimer’s Association advises on its website www.alz.org. “Putting legal, financial and end-of-life plans in place is one of the most important steps you can take. It allows you to participate in making decisions that help family and friends know your wishes.”

Planning for the future includes:

  • Legal Planning (Creating or reviewing legal documents, making legal plans for finances and property, naming someone to make decisions on the senior’s behalf)
  • Financial Planning (Identifying the cost of care, reviewing government benefits or long-term care insurance policies, etc.)
  • Caregiving Decisions (Determining who will help the senior with everyday tasks)
  • End-of-Life Planning (Discussing the senior’s wishes if they become seriously ill, arranging eventual funeral/burial plans, etc.)

These can be very difficult topics to bring up, especially when the senior and his or her family are still feeling overwhelmed by the diagnosis and fearful of what lies ahead. “If you don't have an honest talk about these topics, how will others know and respect your wishes?” the Alzheimer’s Association asks on its website. “Ideally, it's best to express your wishes now while you are able to make decisions for yourself. Addressing your wishes with family members, your care team or a legal professional will ensure that your expressed requests will be followed when appropriate.”

While many family members will take on the caregiver role in their home, Regency Senior Living offers secure memory care in many of our communities, offering the person with dementia a structured environment and specially trained caregivers working around the clock to maintain seniors’ dignity and comfort. To learn more about Regency Senior Living, call (615) 598-0245.

The Alzheimer’s Association offers tools on its website for Alzheimer’s patients. Alzheimer's Navigator® is an online assessment program that helps you create an action plan to meet your specific needs. It also connects you to information, support and local resources. Learn more at https://www.alzheimersnavigator.org/

Written by Steven Stiefel

cxnAbout 12% of Tennessee seniors suffer from Alzheimer's disease, which took 2,440 lives in the state in 2010. That represents the fifth highest Alzheimer's death rate in America and a 138% increase in Alzheimer's deaths since 2000.

Nationally, one in every 3 seniors who dies each year has Alzheimer's or another dementia, according to the Alzheimer's Association.

Coming to grips with an Alzheimer's diagnosis from a doctor can be pretty terrifying. Some may be in denial or fail to recognize the early stages of the disease. But the sooner reality is accepted, the sooner the senior can share his or her wishes for future decisions and put legal, financial and care plans in place while still able to participate in dialogue with loved ones.

At Regency Senior Living, we let families know they are not along in their struggle, offering memory care services. Our memory care residents enjoy all of the benefits of assisted living at Regency to receive help they need with daily activities, but the caregiver-to-resident ratio is greater to give the senior a more personalized level of care.

We form the care strategy after talking with the resident's family to learn what is important to them. We believe that guided independence helps a person in memory care treatment maintain their dignity. We focus on helping them retain their skills through personalized activities and respect their privacy.

Regency works hand-in-hand with the local Alzheimer's Association to assist in continued education of our staff, hosting support groups for our families, and educating people in the Chattanooga area.

The association is organizing the 2014 Walk to End Alzheimer's in Chattanooga on Sept. 20th at the Tennessee RiverPark. A walk event in Cleveland will be Sept. 27th at the Cleveland Greenway. The event raises money to help advance Alzheimer's support, care and research. To donate and/or participate, visit http://act.alz.org/site/TR/Walk2014/TN-MidSouth?fr_id=5421&pg=entry or volunteer with Cindy Lowery at (423) 265-3600.

To learn more about Memory Care at Regency Senior Living, visit http://regencyseniorliving.com/chattanooga-senior-living-options or call (615) 598-0245.

Further reading:

Alzheimer's Association: http://www.alz.org/

The Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center: http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers

Alzheimer's Reading Room: http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/

The New York Times "New Old Age" Blog: http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/

 

Photo Credit: Mr. Theklan via Compfight cc

What To Look For In a Memory Care Facility

Wednesday, 30 January 2013 10:01

blog12It’s not always an easy decision to begin looking for a memory care facility for your loved one. Caretaking is so personal it can be hard to admit that someone you care about needs more than the love and devotion that family can provide. Moving to a memory care facility also means disrupting household routines, changing dynamics, and such a big decision shouldn’t be taken lightly.

However, memory care facilities offer many advantages that the average American home or senior apartment does not. Many are specially designed to help memory care patients function at their absolute best, and come with customized care programs to help manage Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other memory disorders.

When you are investigating a memory care facility, we suggest asking  these questions and looking into the following qualities to ensure you are finding the best possible place for your loved one:

What programs are in place to keep the residents engaged, entertained, happy, and fulfilled? Are there planned activities? Outings?  What opportunities are there for socialization and interaction with others?

Is the building designed in such a way that best accommodates those with memory care needs? Is it safe and secure, easy to navigate, or possibly designed on a loop pattern? Studies have shown that building design can have a big impact on the happiness and health of memory care patients.

How are staff hired? Are they required to have special credentials or training in memory care? How are they chosen from a pool of applicants? What background checks and personality tests are required, if any, to ensure safety and quality of care?

How will the facility keep your loved one safe? Are there procedures and processes for visitation, check in, and check out? What security measures are in place? Is there a safe space for residents to enjoy time outdoors without risk of elopement or getting lost? How carefully managed is the facility to prevent abuse, whether physical ,mental, or through some other means like financial theft or fraud?

By knowing what questions to ask, you can make the retirement residence selection process simpler and more effective. You may need to tour and interview several facilities to find the one that is the best possible fit for your loved one, but when you do, you can have confidence that they are having a wonderful experience that encourages their strengths and effectively treats their weaknesses.